Wednesday , 26 November 2014
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Ocaquatics Swim School celebrates 19 years of teaching water safety

Ocaquatics Swim School celebrates 19 years of teaching water safety

Ocaquatics Swim School celebrates 19 years of teaching water safety

These youngsters learn how to have safe fun in the water.

Ocaquatics is celebrating its 19th anniversary of teaching swimming lessons and water safety to the South Florida community.

Founded in February of 1994 in Miami, Ocaquatics has since grown from doing private lessons in its clients’ homes to a year-round, state-of-the-art indoor facility at 13408 SW 131 St. in West Kendall. A second indoor facility is under construction near Tropical Park. During its 19 years of operation, Ocaquatics has helped thousands of swimmers gain the skills, confidence, and enthusiasm to participate in aquatic sports and activities.

A great deal of the success can be attributed directly to the development of the school’s unique method of teaching. They strive to teach swimming and water safety in a fun and friendly manner. Instructors have earned an unsurpassed reputation for their expertise, dedication, and positive, caring approach. After completing the program, children and parents find their fear of water has been replaced by a knowledge of swimming and a newfound respect and love for the water.

“Looking back, I sometimes find it hard to believe just how many years have passed, and how much we’ve grown,” said Miren Oca, owner of Ocaquatics. “It is important to acknowledge all those who have helped make Ocaquatics such an outstanding company — our students and families, our teachers, and our administrative staff. They are the very best, and I am both proud and humbled by their efforts and accomplishments.”

The primary mission of Ocaquatics Swim School always has been to teach families to love swimming and to become safer, more comfortable, and more responsible around the water.

Water safety is of particular concern in South Florida, where drowning remains the No. 1 killer of children ages 4 and under.

“After working with families for so many years, I believe parents have many misconceptions about drowning and about what it takes to keep it from happening. They think it only happens to children with ‘bad’ parents, but that’s just not the case. A drowning can happen quickly and quietly and it can happen to anyone,” Oca said.

Most parents would be surprised to find out that most drownings of young children occur in backyard pools and that it often happens during a time when a child is in the care of one or both parents.Most young children who have drowned had been missing for less than five minutes when the tragedy occurred.

In addition to pool safety measures another of the best drowning prevention strategies includes teaching children to swim as early as possible. Even toddlers can learn basic swimming skills that they can use if they ever end up in the water.

“It is very important to us that the children in our program enjoy their experience, and we strive to build self-esteem and confidence through positive reinforcement and patience,” Oca said. “Then we teach them basic swimming skills, such as how to roll over on their back and float to the side of the pool.” These are critical skills, and parents should make sure the swimming program they chose will teach them.

“However, even children with excellent swimming skills need the watchful eye of an adult to help keep them safer around the water. Constant supervision around the water is key and no child should ever be left unattended around pools or open water,” she added.

For more information about Ocaquatics, visit www.ocaquatics.com or call 305- 969-7946.

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