Friday , 25 July 2014
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Kendall grandmother debuts her invention on TLC show
Rachel Menton

Kendall grandmother debuts her invention on TLC show

By Katherine Gillett….

Rachel Menton

A new television show hosted by Kelly Ripa recently featured Rachel Menton, staff member of Jewish Community Services of South Florida and president of Dizzy Dames Distributing Company.

A woman of many talents, the Kendall grandmother was selected from hundreds of applicants to be a contestant on TLC’s show, Homemade Millionaire. The program showcases “average” women and their unique inventions, with each episode’s winner receiving assistance in manufacturing, marketing and selling her product.

Menton’s product, called Socks Slots, is a device that keeps socks together in the washing machine and dryer. Born out of a practical need to keep her four children’s socks sorted, Sock Slots is color-coded so each family member has his or her own color. Socks stay in the slot throughout washing and drying — ready to go directly from laundry basket into clothing drawers, which also eliminates the need for sorting and pairing.

For the past 18 years, she has worked as activities director at the Seymour Gelber Adult Day Care Center, a joint venture between JCS and the Miami-Dade County Department of Human Services, Elderly Services Division. The Gelber Center serves the frail elderly focusing on families needing help for their memory-impaired and physically impaired loved ones.

“Working with a frail senior population is my passion,” Menton said.  “Talking to them all day is what I do best. So when I began to talk about my product on the show, Socks Slots, the words just fell easily from my lips.”

The outcome of the show is top secret, but Menton is delighted to have been selected to be on TV with Kelly Ripa. Homemade Millionaire debuted on Nov. 19 on TLC and the segment featuring Menton aired on Friday, Dec. 17, on Discovery Health.

JCS, the largest Jewish social service agency in South Florida, provides critical help in the community, such as delivering meals to frail seniors; counseling families in crisis, and teaching basic job skills to developmentally disabled adults. Each year, more than 35,000 people — regardless of race, religion or ethnic background — benefit from their trained, caring professionals. Although each individual’s circumstance is different, JCS is a lifeline for all.

For more information, call JCS Access at 305-576-6550 or visit online at www.jcsfl.org.