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Diabetes: A Personal Tale

Diabetes: A Personal Tale

Diabetes: A Personal TaleIt has been quite a number of years since the time I rejected life insurance by one of the big life companies.

Then it turned out I had developed Type II Diabetes without ever knowing about it, or, at least, not being cognizant of such changes going on in my body. I thought I was just growing old and not very gracefully at that.

Then as the diabetic condition progressed, I was unable to stay awake for more than an hour or two — without any strength — even after sleeping for many, many hours. At that point, I just thought I was dying, summing it all up by just thinking I was in denial.

But, denial of what?

A mid-40’s male, blessed with inordinate good health and strength? I did not have a family doctor and thought I never really needed one. Never hospitalized, never broke a bone. No family history of diabetes. Nothing!

And yet, I was being cut down like a piece of wood. It just didn’t make any sense. I had nothing to compare it to and my family history did not have the word “Diabetes” in it. Not even a relentless thirst (and other signs) was enough to ring an alarm bell.

Eventually, it took the actions of my wife, Gloria, to locate a doctor and make the appointment. After tests at my first appointment, the doctor quietly told me my blood count was over 500. In total ignorance, that meant nothing to me.

The physician prescribed a little pill which when first taken removed the heavy burden I had been carrying. I will never forget that first feeling of “normalcy.” It was the “night and day” scenario. It got my attention, and while all of that occurred more than 25 years ago, I still clearly remember those events.

Today, the U.S. government says that while there are approximately 30 million diabetics, it estimates there are 70 million undiagnosed or pre-diabetics in this country.

Diabetes is not a death sentence. Many people are living full, productive lives while coping with the disease as treatments improve every year.

So, if you even suspect that you may have some of the common disease symptoms, get tested by a reputable physician.

The sooner you discover your condition, the better the treatment protocols will be for you.

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