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Michael A. Shear: What to look for in a financial advisor
Michael Shear

Michael A. Shear: What to look for in a financial advisor

Michael Shear

The financial events of 2008 brought home to many investors the importance of sound financial advice. The aftermath of the market decline felt by many investors created what can best be described as a crisis of confidence. Shaken by the events in the broader financial world, today’s more timid investors are looking to reduce their anxiety and adopt a course that is soundly based.

Michael A. Shear at Wells Fargo Advisors suggests some common sense considerations when looking for an advisor:

Seek an experienced professional who you feel comfortable with discussing your long term plans.

What is the process the advisor uses to select an appropriate investment program for you?

What are the costs or fees for using a particular advisor and how frequently are they calculated?

If changes are warranted in your portfolio how will the advisor communicate that to you?

Is the advisor engaged in ongoing educational programs to stay abreast of the fast changing world of financial services?

What is the availability of the advisor and how frequently will he/she meet with you to discuss your investments?

Many investors choose an advisor without doing sufficient homework. Shear believes this is a mistake.

“The relationship you have with your financial advisor is as important to your future as any other professional relationship you may have,” says Shear. “Take the time necessary to interview potential advisors, ask pertinent questions. Even the most basic information may be useful to you.

“You need a level of comfort that can turn to confidence and lead to that all important place known as ‘trust,’” adds Shear.

Michael A. Shear welcomes questions.

Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, is located at 19950 W. Country Club Drive, Suite 700 in Aventura.

For more information, call 800- 327-3510 or 305-933-6414 or email Michael.a.shear@wfadvisors.com

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